To Kill a Mockingbird Identity

1239 Words5 Pages
OUR SURROUNDINGS AND THE PEOPLE IN OUR LIVES SHAPE OUR IDENTITY. Good morning ladies and Gentlemen. Do our surroundings and the people in our lives shape our identity? I will explore how this quotation is reflected in the novel “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee, the film ‘Witness’, by Peter Weir, and the film ‘The Lion King’ by Roger Allers. The meaning of identity is not easily defined. Identity generally refers to the stable defining characteristics of a person that makes them an individual. I will explore a number of parallel themes evident in all three texts; the influence of courage, violence, discrimination, religion and the revolutionary nature of the protagonists whose identity is shaped by these themes. Harper Lee…show more content…
However it also indicates his inability to denounce violence when he states ‘It’s my way’. Towards the end of the movie Book has demonstrated that he was able to forego violence in favour of a peaceful resolution. Book initially finds it difficult to assimilate into an Amish lifestyle. Having to live by their moral code sees Book as more accepting and respectful of their belief structures, as seen when he represses the use of violence when confronted by the English at the end of the film. As outlined it is evident in the film ‘Witness’ that the main characters identities are shaped by their surroundings and the people around them. ‘The Lion King’ by Roger Allers features Simba, a young lion cub, struggling to find his place in ‘the circle of life’ who eventually matures into his father due to his strong influence shaping his identity. His father, King Mufasa teaches Simba the ‘delicate balance of nature which bonds all animals together’, and cautions him to prepare for the day he will be called upon to rule shown by the quote, “Everything you see exists together in a delicate balance. As king, you need to understand that balance, and respect all the creatures.” Mufasa and Simba share a special bond and throughout the film his identity begins to emulate that of his fathers. Simba develops a strong belief structure based on courage and respect due to his father’s
Open Document