To What Extent Do the ‘Grand Theories’ Discussed in Book 1, Chapter 2 Take Account of the Role of Social Experiences in Child Development?

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To what extent do the ‘grand theories’ discussed in Book 1, Chapter 2 take account of the role of social experiences in child development? Ask any parent about their child’s development, and they’ll often talk about speech and language development, gross motor skills or even physical growth. But a child’s social development—her ability to interact with other children and adults—is a critical piece of the development puzzle. Children’s Development is a social and cultural as well as a biological process. This is important because as societies become not only culturally diverse but also interconnected, psychological theories are required that fully acknowledge the influence of social context, both within & across cultures. Social…show more content…
Children cannot only learn through direct experience and contingent rewards or punishment; the theory does not seem to explain the vast array of things that children master in the areas of language, cognition & social behaviour. Social Learning Theory Bandura believed that not only is children’s behaviour shaped by its consequences, but also that children learn by watching the behaviour of people around them. In contrast to Behaviourism, Bandura’s social learning theory emphasized the importance of children imitating the behaviour, emotions and attitudes of those they saw around them . His theory explains children’s learning by considering four interrelated factors. To imitate someone a child must: 1. Attend to their behaviour, 2. Retain what they have seen, 3 . Be Physically able to reproduce the behaviour, 4. Be motivated to perform the new behaviour. Bandura conducted a series of experimental studies into children’s tendency to imitate. In these experiments, pre-school children watched adult models act either aggressively or non-aggressively towards an inflatable doll called a ‘Bobo Doll’[6]. The children were subsequently observed to see to what extent they imitated what they had seen. For Bandura the important point was that each group had learned the same behaviour through mere observation; observing the man being punished only affected the

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