To What Extent Was Late Nineteenth-Century and Early Twentieth-Century United States Expansionism a Continuation of Past United States Expansionism and to What Extent Was It a Departure?

1184 WordsMar 15, 20125 Pages
APUSH To what extent was late nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century United States expansionism a continuation of past United States expansionism and to what extent was it a departure? Throughout the history of the United States, America had a desire to expand its boundaries. The United States acquired most of it's land during the nineteenth and early twentieth century with a brief break during the Civil War and Reconstruction. However, the way America went about graining new lands drastically changed from non-aggressive means in the beginning to extremely aggressive means towards the end. This essay will depict the extent to how late nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century United States expansionism was a continuation…show more content…
The foreign policies that President Roosevelt employed were ultra aggressive. The foreign policies were heavily enforced using his newly built naval force, the arm of offensive power, as a way to conquer the world, an idea brought to Roosevelt’s attention due to Alfred T. Mahan’s The Interest of America in Sea Power. Mahan's article claimed that America must go forth with expansionism, for an “increasing volume of public sentiment demands it”, “the growing production of the country demands it”, and that “the Americans must now look onward” (Doc. C). Mahan's tactics were heavily reliant on naval forces. He believed that “Three things are needful: first, protection of the chief harbors, by fortifications and coast-defense ships...Secondly, naval force, the arm of offensive power, which alone enables a country to extend its influence outward” and “thirdly, no foreign state should henceforth acquire a coaling position within three thousand miles of San Francisco” (Doc. C) Aside from these, the economy was the factor running most constantly through expansionism and imperialism. During expansionism, Americans were looking to spread out, enjoy their own property, farm their land, and make their lives better. Imperialists’ desire was also to fuel the economy. People saw other lands as a way to get the “needed” materials they couldn’t get elsewhere. Theodore Roosevelt and all Americans saw the land as a place where they could

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