To compare The Charge of the Light Brigade with The Destruction of

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To compare The Charge of the Light Brigade with The Destruction of
Sennacherib

In this essay we are going to be comparing two war poems. They are
‘The Charge of the Light Brigade’ by Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809-1892) and ‘The Destruction of Sennacherib’ by Lord Byron (1788-1824).

‘The Charge of the Light Brigade’ is set in the Crimean war. It is about the British cavalry getting the wrong orders and going straight at the enemy’s cannons. ‘The Destruction of Sennacherib’ is a biblical story. The story tells us about a whole army being wiped out really quickly as they slept by the ‘Angel of Death’.

The first poem we are going to look at is ‘The Charge of the Light
Brigade’ by Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809-1892). In this poem
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Only once in the poem does Tennyson mention that a mistake has been made by saying
‘not though the soldier knew. Someone had blundered’. As the soldiers rode through the ‘valley of death’ they were surrounded by the Russian cannons as the poem says ‘Cannon to right of them, Cannon to left of them, Cannon in front of them. This tells us that the Russians had the
British cavalry surrounded with cannons and were going to fire them as quickly as they could so they could kill as many soldiers as they could before they got to the Russian front line. At the end of the poem, in the last verse Tennyson wrote ‘Honour the charge they made,
Honour the light brigade, Noble six hundred’. This tells us that in some way Tennyson wanted people to look at the Light Brigade as heroes. Now we are going to look at the second war poem ‘The destruction of
Sennacherib’ by Lord Byron (1788-1824). This poem is a biblical story.
The battle took place in Mesopotamia (roughly where Iraq is now). The poem has rhyming couplets all the way through in the pattern AA BB. In the first verse there are two similes which try to emphasise the threat of the invading army. When the Assyrian army got wiped out by the ‘Angel of Death’ (here Lord Byron uses personification), it says that the army was wiped out very quickly. In the poem, it says ‘And breathed in the face of the foe as he pass’d’. This suggests to us that the Assyrian army was wiped out as quickly as
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