To compare the ways in which these poems display the horrors of war.

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To compare the ways in which these poems display the horrors of war.
I have selected three poems, The Soldier, by Rupert Brooke, Dulce et
Decorum Est, and Anthem for Doomed Youth, both written by Wilfred Owen.

Compare how these poems show the horrors of World War 1.

To compare the ways in which these poems display the horrors of war. I have selected three poems, "The Soldier", by Rupert Brooke, "Dulce et
Decorum Est", and "Anthem for Doomed Youth", both written by Wilfred
Owen. I chose "Anthem for Doomed Youth" and "Dulce et Decorum Est" because they are very similar and show the horrors of the war. On the other hand, I chose "The Soldier" because it is a complete contrast and is about the remembrance of the soldiers, who
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He also shows the courage of the soldiers by writing, "Men marched asleep". Many had lost their boots, but limped on, blood-shod". The first stanza has eight lines and follows the rhyming scheme of A, B, A, B through out the poem.
Owen uses this stanza as a tool to build-up the story and is able to set the scene for the reader. Owen uses many similes in this poem and writes, "Bent double, like old beggars under sacks," and "Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge". Owen uses a number of verbs as adjectives such as "haunting flares" and "dropping flares…" The second Stanza is six lines and it also has the rhyming scheme A, B, A, B, C, D.

Throughout the stanza Owen uses graphic detail to emphasise the pain of the soldiers, which creates for the reader a violent image, which is calmed down by the last line, "Of gas- shells dropping softly behind." The next line is, "Gas! Gas! Quick, boys!" Again this changes the mood, from peaceful to violent. The reader then becomes prepared for some action in the poem. This is a swift build up of description into the untimely demise of one of the soldiers. There are a lot of one word sentences and exclamation marks to show the panic and horror of the soldiers.

The soldier, who is harmed by the gas bomb, is described by Wilfred
Owen as a helpless creature through the usage of words such as
"floundering". The polluted air around him is described as "a green
sea."
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