Today more than ever, college sports are not just a game but instead a billion dollar business. The

1100 WordsApr 23, 20195 Pages
Today more than ever, college sports are not just a game but instead a billion dollar business. The NCAA likes to refer to student athletes as amateurs and believes they shouldn’t be compensated while many others can argue that the players are being manipulated and exploited and deserve to be paid for play. Those who support the NCAA’s decision not to pay the players agree that there is no payment system that would fairly pay all students of all sports. They also believe that students are already being paid through their full or partial scholarships. Those who oppose these ideas believe that athletes are taken advantage of and deserve a cut of the millions they are making for the NCAA and the university they attend. The controversial…show more content…
However, after the 1940’s the NCAA allowed changes to scholarships every few years. In 1973, the NCAA restricted scholarships to one year at a time. This meant that even if the athlete performed well in the classroom, the scholarship was at risk if his performance on the field was not up to par. Some can argue that the restrictions goes against “for the love of the game” and is more about which players make the team more money. USA Today’s Eitzen D. Standley believes the word amateur is not the correct term for a student athlete. Standley believes student athletes are mistreated physically and mentally and compares college sports to a slave plantation system. She says by keeping the amateur status the NCAA, who she refers to as plantation owners, benefit themselves in two ways. By not paying the athletes, the schools expenses are reduced making the enterprise much more profitable. Second, Standley states since college athletic departments and the NCAA are considered part of the educational mission, they are not required to pay taxes on their millions from television contracts, sponsorships, licensing, the sale of boxes and season tickets, and gate receipts. So I can’t help but wonder if President Emmert and the members of the NCAA want to hold on to amateurism for the love of the game or the love of their pockets. Many who oppose paying college athletes also argue that the players are already being compensated with scholarship money. ESPN’s Scoop Jackson claims

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