Essay on Transcendence and Transgression in Toni Morrison's Sula

1184 Words 5 Pages
The Black women writers like Alice Walker, Paule Marshall, Toni Cade Banbara and Toni Morrison have always propagated the black feminist consciousness through their works. By giving voice to the voiceless, these writers renounce all the negative stereotypical images of black women. Morrison is an important writer among the league who has always startled her readers with her creative powers by giving her work such a finesse that one feels engulfed in her storyline. Awarded the Nobel Prize in 1993, her novels are replete with African American cultural aura : myths, symbols, festivals and the name that she assigns to her characters. Sula (1973) is the second novel of Toni Morrison which is set in her Medallion, Ohio. The novel involved a lot …show more content…
The Black women writers like Alice Walker, Paule Marshall, Toni Cade Banbara and Toni Morrison have always propagated the black feminist consciousness through their works. By giving voice to the voiceless, these writers renounce all the negative stereotypical images of black women. Morrison is an important writer among the league who has always startled her readers with her creative powers by giving her work such a finesse that one feels engulfed in her storyline. Awarded the Nobel Prize in 1993, her novels are replete with African American cultural aura : myths, symbols, festivals and the name that she assigns to her characters. Sula (1973) is the second novel of Toni Morrison which is set in her Medallion, Ohio. The novel involved a lot of critical attention as far as her depiction of Sula is concerned. Sula, the protagonist of this eponymous novel, is unlike the other female protagonists for the way she attains her personal identity is quite unusual. She is not a conventional woman who accepts the societal laws and norms wholeheartedly but her heroism lies in her way of abrogating such societal pressures. She challenges all such patriarchal paradigms that aim at belittling black women. The birth of the community “Bottom” directs us to the notions of racism prevalent in America. The name Bottom is ironic in the sense that it is high up the hills and hence believed to be a “nigger joke”. The master outwits his slave by offering him such land where the living was tiresome.
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