‘Transformed Beyond Recognition from the Vision of the Founding Fathers.’ Discuss This View of the Modern Us Constitution.

964 Words Jan 19th, 2014 4 Pages
‘Transformed beyond recognition from the vision of the Founding Fathers.’ Discuss this view of the modern US constitution.

In many ways, the US constitution has changed and shifted since its creation in 1787. It has changed, with power being put into the hands of bodies not specified in the constitution and certain constraints on power no longer existing. All in all, however, the constitution has maintained the very thing it was created for- to limit the power of the government and protect the people from tyranny of the executive. In this sense, the constitution is still very much embodying the vision of the founding fathers and is relatively unchanged given the lengthy period of time they have existed for. The powers of the president
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This has meant that although the words of the Founding Fathers do appear to still be relevant and present in the constitution, these words are being altered and changed- losing their original meaning and not resembling what the founding fathers wanted them to at all.

Many elements of the constitution remain unchanged. Due to the nature of the US constitution being codified, it has required a two thirds majority in Congress to change anything and this has meant that it hasn’t been greatly changed since the time it was made. The Bill of rights had remained pretty much the same since its creation. The right to bear arms, for example, is still a part of the conversation and despite many people wishing to amend it, this has not been able to happen. This proves the ridgity that the Founding Fathers wanted to give the Constitution. The Founding Fathers created the federal constitution during their time and this contained an intricate set of checks and balances between different levels and branches of government. This remains relatively unchanged within the US constitution. This set of checks and balances works in a way that makes the different branches of government still have independence and work on their own, but also requires them to work together interdependently. This creates better, stronger…