Trident His 205 Entire Course

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TRIDENT HIS 205 ENTIRE COURSE
(ALL CASE AND SLPS)

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Question
HIS205 History and Impact of the Internet (SEP2015FT-1)
Module 1 – Case
PRE-INTERNET DEVELOPMENT
Let’s start off with some general context. Here’s a very interesting short video, worth watching: Bilgil, M. (2009) History of the Internet. Vimeo. [Video file]. Retrieved from http://vimeo.com/2696386 You may also want to review some of the sources listed in the Background as “of general interest”, with particular attention to the
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The original 100-minute video of this event is part of the Engelbart Collection in Special Collections of Stanford University. This original video has been edited into 35 segments and reformatted as Flash streaming video clips. There is a brief abstract of the subject matter treated in each segment.” You can see the whole collection along with some supplementary information online at http://sloan.stanford.edu/MouseSite/1968Demo.html. Of particular interest are Clips 1-3, 7, 9-11, 15, 21, 25, 31, and 34; of course, if possible it’s best to watch the a video stream of the complete demo. In a later interview, Englebart summed up the accomplishments of his project thusly: “We weren’t interested in ‘automation’ but in ‘augmentation.’ We were not just building a tool, we were designing an entire system for working with knowledge. Automation means if you’re milking a cow, you get a tool that will milk it for you. But to augment the milking of a cow, you invent the telephone. The telephone not only changes how you milk, but the rest of the way you work as well. It touches the entire process. It was a paradigm shift.” Jordan, K. (2004). The Click heard round The world. Wired. Retrieved from http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/12.01/mouse_pr.html] This language of “augmentation” rather than “automation” or even “computerization” has been characteristic of all Englebart’s approach; here’s a good short suimmary of this in his own words. Please zoom