True Love in William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream

1928 WordsJul 8, 20188 Pages
True Love in William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream I have been studying A Midsummer Night’s Dream and exploring how the characters within this play deal with love and the consequences resulting from falling in love. I will be answering the question asked by providing quotes and examples of Shakespeare’s technique in showing that ‘The course of true love never did run smooth’ as well as providing answers as to why Shakespeare made this the case in the play. Shakespeare was born on the 23rd April, in an English town called Stratford-Upon-Avon in the year 1564. He lived for 52 years, and in this time he wrote over 100 plays and sonnets, including ‘Romeo and Juliet’, ‘Macbeth’ and…show more content…
This is a good way of creating sympathy for the character as most people have experienced unrequited love at some point in their lives, even if it wasn’t in quite the same way as Helena and Demetrius. There are another set of lovers in the play – Oberon and Titania – and again, another technique used to portray a different kind of love. This time it seems to be love gone sour, as Titania and Oberon are technically married but are always apart and trying to avoid each other. Before we actually meet the couple, we see one of Titania’s fairies and Oberon’s jester Puck have a quick conversation. “The King doth keep his revels here tonight. Take heed the Queen come not within his sight,” Here, Shakespeare is trying to give us a little bit of background information on the couple by telling us that the King and Queen must not meet on the Oberon’s instruction. Basically, in this part of Puck’s speech, he is letting us know that the fairy King and Queen do not get on and this is another one of the techniques Shakespeare uses to show that love isn’t always perfect – perhaps even telling us that arranged marriages don’t work. Even Titania’s fairies seem to have been trained to hate anything related to Oberon when the Fairy exclaims ‘you
Open Document