Tuberculosis Outbreak Of 1916, Dr. Haven Emerson, The Health Commissioner For New York City

1852 WordsNov 30, 20168 Pages
Introduction In a response to the polio outbreak of 1916, Dr. Haven Emerson, the Health Commissioner for New York City, stated: “we have learned little that is new about the disease, but much that is old about ourselves.” The meaning of this has to do with the ideology that no matter the era, people have a common response to the outbreak of contagious disease. Human nature supplies us as humans with a common reaction to dealing with disease, and it is one that can be seen during the Black Death, polio epidemics, and ebola epidemics, as well as many other epidemics. These responses can be both positive and negative, and often have to do with containment of the disease, preventative measures - which may or may not be effective; and scapegoating. Although there may be individualized responses for each of these diseases, the way in which the health-care officers and the public handle the outbreak of disease generally follows the same pattern overall. Containment One of the most vital ways to end a disease epidemic has to do with containment of the disease. Containment is defined as figuring out the extent of the problem, then trying to keep it from spreading. These methods have developed to be more advanced over time, yet have remained fundamentally the same throughout history. In the case of the plague, containment was practiced through pest houses, which were essentially isolation hospitals. These were often located away from the city, often on islands, and kept those

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