Type 2 Diabetes: Therapeutic Analysis

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Considerable advances in the past treatment of type II diabetes include the application of lifestyle intervention and prevention efforts aimed at delaying development of glucose intolerance in order to evade diabetes and the progression of new curricula of glucose in the blood-lowering prescriptions to appendage current treatments (DeFronzo, 2010) (Mazzola, 2012). Presently, the control and maintenance of type II diabetes centres on control of glucose by the decrease of haemoglobin and glucose in the blood (DeFronzo, 2010). Current treatment strategies focus on the progression of therapeutic factors that affect the defects contributing to type II diabetes and thus, provide sustainable glucose control through a delaying of disease development…show more content…
Currently pre-diabetes is detected when assessing patients for type II diabetes (Lee & Flack, 2015; The National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS), 2008). The increasing prevalence of type II diabetes that in the past, has risen from 7.4 percent in 2000 and is predicted in increase 11.4 percent in 2025 according to Dr Angela Lee, Endocrinology Advanced Trainee at the Diabetes Centre at the University of Sydney, presents serious implications including increased healthcare expenditure and decreased quality of life (Lee & Flack, 2015). Due to the risk of the further development of type II diabetes, patients with IGT or IFG (Refer to Note 1 for additional information), are regularly tested for type II diabetes. Early diagnosis and intervention to lifestyle and pharmacotherapy have shown to successfully prevent or delay type II diabetes in adults (Murphy & Winmill, 2013). The National Evidence Based Guideline for Case Detection and Diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes gives recommendation for the retesting of these patients annually. Whilst in the past, type II diabetes has been a disease primarily affecting middle-aged and elderly individuals, due to increasing lifestyle changes such as the strong prevalence of electronic appliances, affluence and obesity epidemics, it is keenly observed that type II diabetes…show more content…
While this makes the issue of pre-diabetic screening for individuals aged 20 years and over even more relevant and urgent, certain issues must be considered in the spectre of public health. Current suggestions have considered that the screening of young adults for pre-diabetes needs to be more advanced. Data clearly shows that 30 percent of individuals with undiagnosed type II diabetes have a nondiabetic fasting glucose but still are at high risk of cardiovascular disease (The National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS), 2008). Therefore, this suggests that oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT) should be part of mandatory screenings (Alberti & Yach, 2003). Certified sources have reviewed this suggestion, such as the World Health Organisation, who recommended its use on adults, specifically for those who suffer from nondiabetic fasting glucose. Moreover, recommendations for future annual screening for pre-diabetes for individuals 20 years and over will result to more effective and efficient management and prevention of the adverse consequences of the disease. These include screening individuals with only increased blood pressure. Individuals who not meet
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