UML - Unified Modeling Language

5761 Words24 Pages
I. Table of contents II. TABLE OF INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE III III. TABLE OF ABBREVIATIONS IV IV. TABLE OF FIGURES V 1. INTRODUCTION 1 2. GENERAL VIEW OF UML 2 2.1 DEVELOPMENT OF UML 2 2.2 DEFINITION UML 3 2.3 OVERVIEW OF DIAGRAM TYPES 4 3. ACTIVITY DIAGRAM 6 3.1 FIELDS OF APPLICATION OF THE ACTIVITY DIAGRAM 6 3.2 NOTATION ELEMENTS OF THE ACTIVITY DIAGRAM 6 4. EXAMPLE OF USE IN LOGISTICAL PRACTICE 11 4.1 HOW TO USE AN ACTIVITY DIAGRAM 11 4.2 HOW TO MODIFY AN ACTIVITY DIAGRAM 13 4.2.1 Step 1 – describe the process 13 4.2.2 Step 2 – identify the elements 14 4.2.3 Step 3 – visualize the process 15 5. CRITICAL APPRAISAL OF UML 16 5.1 NOTATION ELEMENTS 17 5.2 STRUCTURAL FORM 17 5.3 IMPLEMENTATION 18 6. CONCLUSION 19 V.…show more content…
The paper concludes with a critical appraisal in connection with a comparison to other process documentation methods in chapter 5 and a terminal conclusion in chapter 6. 2. General view of UML In the following, a general overview of UML as a unified language will be given. It is important to provide a basis for a better understanding of how UML works in logistical processes. Therefore a short outline of the history and the development of UML will be presented with a subsequent explanation of what UML is and what types of diagrams exist. 2.1 Development of UML The origin of UML is software development. But in the 90’s, a large number of different approaches, several books on object-oriented software modeling and a lot of graphical notations existed. The most prominent representatives of object-oriented notations are Booch from Grady Booch, Objectory from Ivar Jacobson and Object Modeling Technique (OMT) from James Rumbaugh. The initiators of UML gradually recognized the significance of a unified method for software engineering. In 1995 Grady Booch and Jim Rumbaugh combined their both methods Booch and OMT and announced Unified Method 0.8 (UM 0.8) at the conference OOPSLA in Austin, Texas. But this method lacked on the integration of the customer and the user of the system. Soon Ivar Jacobson who brought the focus to the Use Case Diagram joined Booch and Rumbaugh. Together they reduced the range of UM 0.8 to a pure language and so developed the
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