Unanswered Essay

807 Words Nov 11th, 2014 4 Pages
Unanswered
In life, there is a set of questions that causes people to question their purpose in the world. These questions were designed to be simply that; questions. They have no answer and once the answer seems to become apparent, it changes into a defining moment, according to Jim Tilley. These defining moments that were once questions are the things that document our lives and how far we have come. Jim Tilley wrote the poem The Big Questions to talk about and parallel these things with everyday life. “The big questions are big only/ because they have never been answered (line 1/2).” Jim Tilley begins his poem The Big Questions, by posing a philosophical statement in which the audience begins to ponder what these questions might be.
…show more content…
Some may say that it was by chance while others may say that it was fate. Tilley chose to end line 9 with the phrase “can’t” because that is a phrase that constantly floats around the pessimistic mind. It wrestles with the fact that there are always situations in which one feels as though they “can’t”. However, the answer to that question is clear to the bear who has determined that you are going to be his lunch.
The grizzly bear is a metaphor for a problem encountered in life. The three options used to rationalize what to do when encountering a bear also parallel to what to do in a tough situation. When faced with a problem, everyone has a different rationalization to deal with it. The options are a constant that can be applied to any circumstance in life: run away, confront it or sit aside and wait. What we do in tough situations directly correlates to our response in previous life experiences. In the past, these tough situations were big questions that made us wonder the typical “why did this have to happen to me?” Tilley refers to these as defining moments.
These defining moments are the things that further our experiences and what help to shape us. “So this can be a defining moment, /but not a big question…” (Line 20/21). Tilley seems to make a point that the big questions will all ultimately turn into defining moments. As anyone would realize while