Under What Conditions (If Ever) Should States Become Involved in Domestic Political Situations of Other Countries

3163 WordsMay 13, 201313 Pages
INTRODUCTION: It has previously been held that, the States should not interfere with the domestic political affairs of other countries, since all sovereign states should have complete control of their own citizenry, free from outside interference. This is in line with the Policy Agenda of the U.S. Department of State which states that the goals of the foreign policy are “to create a more secure, democratic, and prosperous world for the benefit of the American people and the international community” (Kissinger 2001, p4) The foreign policy of the United States is the guiding principle for which the United States interacts with foreign nations and sets standards of interaction for its corporations, and even its citizens. However,…show more content…
(Hrea.org p132). It is in every essence different from humanitarian aid which is provided by non-governmental organizations such as Red Cross. Humanitarian aid attempts to find a way around political affiliations. For humanitarian intervention, use of military force is a central feature, though it has fundamental values that support it such as justice, state sovereignty, world order and politics. Moreover, the principles that govern humanitarian intervention are just cause, proportionality, last resort, good over harm, right intention and reasonable prospect. However, humanitarian intervention is not the only means by which a nation could get involved in other nations’ politics. There’s always room for diplomacy. Diplomacy could come in the form of material incentives. These are threats of punishment to non-cooperation, swell as rewards for cooperation. There’s also imposition of third party preferred outcomes. However the challenge with such strategies is that only strong states have the wherewithal to make significant material offers and threats and the parties directly involved in a conflict often care more about its outcome than third-party states care about ending it, so the credibility of such threats and offers is often in doubt. (Kydd, p104) Such states are inclusive of the United States, which is currently the world’s most powerful nation. Two concepts of sovereignty National Sovereignty is the absolute and
Open Document