Understanding Bipolar Disorder in Children

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Understanding Bipolar Disorder in Children by Patricia Oakes November 6, 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS ABSTRACT……………………………………………………………………………..i INTRODUCTION………………………………………………………………………1 FINDING AND CONCLUSIONS……………………………………………………..2 LIVING DAILY LIFE: HELPING YOUR TEEN AT HOME AND SCHOOL……2 HOW CAN YOU WORK TOGETHER WITH YOUR CHILD’S TEACHERS?....3 SCHOOL & THE CHILD WITH BIPOLAR DISORDER………………………….4 DISORDERS THAT CAN ACCOMPANY BIPOLAR DISORDER……………….5 WORKING WITH THE SCHOOLS…………………………………………………..6 MEDICATIONS USED TO TREAT CHILD AND ADOLESCENT METAL DISORDERS…………………………………………………………………………….7 PSYCHOTHERAPY……………………………………………………………………8 CONCLUSION………………………………………………………………………….9 WORK CITED………………………………………………………………………….10…show more content…
It’s a natural phase in the evolution of your role as a parent. While your relationship with your teen will change, that doesn’t mean it becomes any less significant. In fact, your teen may need the security of your love and support more than ever now. The way you communicate with your adolescent and structure your family life can have a major impact on how your teen functions at home which can influence how your teen functions in other situations. The time and energy you devote to your other children, your significant other, and yourself can help keep the teen’s issues in perspective, a good thing for all of you. And the way you address school issues and advocate for your teenager’s educational needs can have a decisive impact on his or her success in school. All the while, you’ll be slowly but surely working toward one of the most difficult but ultimately gratifying tasks for any parent letting go. As the parents of an adolescent with depression or bipolar disorder, you may have to take things a bit more gradually than other parents, but the ultimate goal of helping your child move toward a healthy, productive, independent life as a young adult is still the same. What can the school do to help my child with bipolar disorder? Teachers often are the first to notice the symptoms of bipolar disorder, and can provide parents, guardians, and doctors with information that may help diagnose and treat the disorder. They also can play
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