Universal Declaration Of Human Rights

1263 WordsOct 7, 20146 Pages
According to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, a doctrine created to ensure a mutual standard of treatment amongst all humans, every person deserves an equal set of life standards. According to Article 18 of this 30 Article document, “everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, to manifest his religion or belief in teaching, practice, worship and observance” (Campbell, MacKinnon, and Stevens 98). This document also states in Article 5, “no one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment” (Campbell, Mackinnon, and Stevens 97). The idea of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is commendable and I believe that achieving the goals that it states is necessary for ultimate global progress, but it unfortunately falls flat when put into practice, comparable in assessment to the goals and purpose of the United Nations versus the actual actions of the United Nations. Many of the declarations in the UDHR overlap with one another and prevent certain action from occurring. In the contentious issue of Female Genital Cutting, we can see the above articles clashing with one another. While it is every persons right to be able to freely practice their religion, it is also apparently every persons right to be able to be free of any degrading and harmful treatment that
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