Universal Health Care: Do Time and Place Matter? Essay

878 Words4 Pages
Universal health care models are currently adopted by many countries worldwide. Although a superficial look at these systems may show many similarities, a detailed analysis shows differences in their philosophies, standards of care, delivery models, and recipients’ expectations. This paper takes a closer look at the universal health care models in Canada, United Kingdom, Australia, Germany, and Japan in comparison to the American system. Gold standards of health care services Gold standards of health care services are paramount in advanced countries but yet its concept differ among different countries and cultures. In the United States, it is critical to foster a new health care model because of the rising cost and limited access to…show more content…
For example, in Japan, the system is built on both employment-based and community-based health insurance (Shibuya et al., 2011). Under this system, everyone is insured and all providers equally receive fixed fee for service under all different plans (Shibuya et al., 2011). This payment system, like the American one, does not set providers budgets (McLaughlin & McLaughlin, 2008), but it maintains low cost by controlling the fee per service. Uniquely, the Canadian public health system focuses on the population’s overall health via disease surveillance, community health assessment, injury prevention, and health promotion (Johnson & Stoskopf, 2010). That rationale reflects on many aspects of the health system; for example, the Canadian system is under equipped with many technologies like MRI machines (Johnson & Stoskopf, 2010). Similarly, most hospitals in Japan are equipped with outdated technology that is barely sufficient (McLaughlin & McLaughlin, 2008). On the other hand, American hospitals devote a much higher budget to similar technologies (Johnson & Stoskopf, 2010). Funding sources Evidently, most of the universal health care models are funded through different payment facets through both private and government systems. In Germany, different sources fund the health care system; and individual benefits mainly depend on their employment status (McLaughlin & McLaughlin,
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