Use Of Force And Law Enforcement

1976 WordsFeb 22, 20178 Pages
What is the use of force in law enforcement? By dictionary definition, the use of force is the amount of effort required by police to compel compliance by an unwilling subject. This subject throughout the last year or two has become more and more controversial, leading to the formation of yet another organization of those who feel they were and are affected the most. Then there 's the media that fuels these organizations, whether it 's factual information or not, but does anybody ask themselves what they think they might do in a possible life or death situation? In the everyday work of a police officer, there is the obvious possibility of coming head on with a life or death situation, to combat this fear and situation they must accurately…show more content…
Cato Institute’s National Police Misconduct Reporting Project conducted a research and reported their statistics on police misconduct which confirm that only around 1% of all officers commit misconduct in a given year (Police Misconduct, 2016). The statistics from this research contains all kinds of misconduct that may have have occurred in any way or form that falls under the given definition. In recognizing this it can be concluded that police brutality itself would fall even lower on that scale, below the 1% mark (Police Misconduct, 2016). Until a law changed this in 1985, most of the country had something called the “any felony” policy (Justice, 2002). This policy supported that police could use firearms or any other means of deadly force to arrest a person suspected of committing any felony (Justice, 2002). Some states even permitted police to shoot a fleeing victim (Justice, 2002). Although, there were several states that put limits on when an officer can use deadly force (Justice, 2002). 12 states had no view or stand at all on police use of deadly force (Justice, 2002). Our police force is the way it is now because of a lawsuit that was placed against a case, Tennessee VS. Garner. The supreme court 's decision in this case in 1985, placed restrictions on the use of deadly force (Justice, 2002). This ruling according to the US Department of
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