Use of Symbolism in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird

461 WordsFeb 21, 20182 Pages
Harper Lee use of symbolism is extent and throughout the major events in To Kill a Mockingbird to show the details behind the events. A seven-year old girl, Scout, tells the story and symbols may not be as obvious to her as it would the reader. Lee uses the camellias, courage, and the mockingbird as important symbols in the book. Lee uses symbolism throughout the book making it overt and obvious. The camellias are two different symbols in the book. Lee uses them for Jem and Mrs. Dubose. Jem’s action of cutting the heads off Mrs. Dubose’s camellias show that his is still young and rash, he acted out of anger which later changes throughout the book. After Mrs. Dubose dies, she left a camellia for Jem, but Jem being immature, cannot realize that good and evil can live in the same person. The camellias symbolize for Mrs. Dubose that good and evil can live in the same person but to find the purity in people you have to dig down deep and pull the roots up. She left him the camellia as a good gesture to tell Jem that she appreciated him. Also throughout the book bravery takes a major role. Also throughout the book bravery takes a major role. As well as the camellias, bravery is another symbol. Atticus Finch and Boo Radley have a great amount of bravery in the novel, whether it is overcoming their past, rejection, or sticking up for what one believes in. They both show the kindness they have through their bravery. Atticus took on the “impossible” case defending Tom Robinson
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