Valley Region of the Appalachian Mountains Essay example

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Valley Region of the Appalachian Mountains and Subsequent Karst Regions in the State of Virginia

This map which appears on page 402 of Process Geomorphology (1995), written by Dale
F. Ritter, Craig R. Kochel, and Jerry R. Miller, serves as the basis of my report on the formation of the Appalachian Mountains and its subsequent karst regions in along the
Atlantic side of the United States particularly in the state of Virginia. The shaded areas represent generalized karst regions throughout the United States.

The state of Virginia is divided into five major physiological regions based on similar landscapes and relatively static climates, each region being as diverse as the next.
From the east to west they are respectively named,
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(Stanley, 349) However, it was not until the third episode, during
Cenozoic era, that the “conspicuous fold and thrust belt of the central and southern
Appalachians formed” as the result of the mid-carboniferous collision of Euroamerica with Gondwanaland (Stanley, 372).
At the point of impact between the Euroamerica and Gondwanaland plates, immense pressure turned igneous and sedimentary rock into metamorphic rock which proceeded to break in numerous places. The resulting fold and thrust belt were exceedingly susceptible to weathering and erosion by means of wind and water. Streams began to flow along weak layers that define the folds and faults and carved the resistant folded rocks of the mountain core creating karst geologic structures.
The karst regions of Virginia exist today in a “stillmountainous region is a zone of low temperature deformation called the Valley and Ridge Province (Stanley, 372).” The
Valley and Ridge Province is said the be the, “most rugged area of the state” as this region consists of both high peaks and low lying valleys extending from present day Virginia, to Maryland, and northwestward to West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and northern
New Jersey. The ridges are composed of fairly resistant strata while the valleys depict erodable materials. Patterson