Veteran Suicide Perspectives And Assumptions . There Is

1456 WordsApr 6, 20176 Pages
Veteran Suicide Perspectives and Assumptions There is an epidemic running rampant throughout the ranks of veterans and current active duty military within the United States. Even if we try to turn a blind eye or ignore the problem, the fact is that roughly an average of twenty-two veterans commit suicide each and every day across America. Some would say this is due in part to the service members experiencing Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), others would say this is due to service members participating in multiple deployments. While these both increase risk factors for suicide, they in and of themselves are not the root cause of suicide amongst our veterans. So if these are not the sole contributors to veteran suicide, what is…show more content…
Nevertheless, those veterans that present symptoms of PTSD are at a greater risk for suicide due in part to the comorbid symptoms that often times are correlated to PTSD – such as substance abuse, intrusive thoughts, and depression. For some time now, many have held the philosophy that the ever increasing deployment tempo and lengths of deployments have held significant value in the rising rate of suicides amongst our military and veterans. Combat trauma and other traumatic events experienced while deployed has also been on the hot seat as a predominate factor for being at risk. Whereas combat deployments can have a profound impact on the psychological and cognitive functioning of an individual, it is being seen that there is a significant percentage of individuals committing suicide that have never deployed. Stressors from military life in general are having a huge impact on the suicide rates of military members and veterans. Cerel, Van de Venne, Moore, Maple, Flaherty, & Brown (2015) found that “Stress on the entire military due to the length of these recent conflicts and the burden placed on all the forces has been linked to suicide risk among those who were never deployed. Other non-combat military- related events, such as exposure to death from training accidents, are expected incidents during military service but are also associated with PTSD, depression, and anxiety disorders” (p. 83). Underlying Theories If PTSD and deployments,
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