Vietnam War and American Culture

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Vietnam Wars Impact on American Culture Donna Whittle DeVry University Introduction to Humanities I. Introduction and Thesis Statement In the 1960’s America went through many cultural changes. Martin Luther King Jr., a civil rights activist, delivered his famous, “I have a dream” speech. African Americans were fighting for peace, freedom and equality. The United States was involved in the Vietnam War, committed to anti-communism. African Americans were deployed to Vietnam. The Vietnam War and Civil Rights Movement coincided. African Americans believed fighting for democracy abroad would help gain civil rights at home. II. Events that Led to the Advancement January 20, 1961, John F. Kennedy…show more content…
Young people known as “hippies” started protesting through long hair, music, sex and drugs. During the movement the famous Woodstock Music Festival emerged. During Woodstock it was believed personal rebellion reigned over political rebellion. Open sex and drugs swept America. Gallagher, B. (May, 2013). The Vietnam War and the Civil Rights Movement. Retrieved from http://www.americansc.org.uk/online/vietnam_civil_rights.htm This article discusses President Lyndon B. Johnson’s involvement with Vietnam and civil rights. Vietnam and Civil Rights Movement protests coincided. African Americans were discriminated against at home and in the United States armed forces. In previous history blacks fought segregated in war. During Vietnam blacks were intergraded with a small number of segregated troops. Blacks fought for democracy believing they would return home with equal rights. Blacks felt they had earned the right to be equal. After returning home from Vietnam, blacks remained discriminated against. The war heightened awareness of discrimination. Martin Luther King Jr., with blacks and whites, marched to Washington to protest for equal rights. Kings speech was one of the most powerful protests in history. His speech for freedom was televised across America. King was assassinated and white soldiers applauded his death. The military began posting confederate flags on equipment. Racism was tolerated in military bases. Legislation passed the Civil Rights Act in 1964.
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