Views of Swami Vivekananda in the Field of Education.

2060 Words Dec 27th, 2011 9 Pages
Swami Vivekananda realizes that mankind is passing through a crisis. The tremendous emphasis on the scientific and mechanical ways of life is fast reducing man to the status of a machine. Moral and religious values are being undermined. The fundamental principles of civilization are being ignored. Conflicts of ideals, manners and habits are pervading the atmosphere. Disregard for everything old is the fashion of the day. Vivekananda seeks the solutions of all these social and global evils through education. With this end in view, he feels the dire need of awakening man to his spiritual self wherein, he thinks, lies the very purpose of education. Swami Vivekananda (1863 – 1902), a great thinker and reformer of India, embraces education, …show more content…
By way of illustration, he mentions that the chemist in the laboratory concentrates all the powers of his mind and brings them into one focus-the elements to be analyzed-and finds out their secrets. Concentration, which necessarily implies detachment from other things, constitutes a part of Brahmacharya, which is one of the guiding mottos of his scheme of education. Brahmacharya, in a nutshell, stands for the practice of self-control for securing harmony of the impulses. To quote him: ‘Education is not the amount of information that is put into your brain and runs riot there undigested, all your life.’ By his philosophy of education, Swamiji thus brings it home that education is not a mere accumulation of information but a comprehensive training for life. Education for him means that process by which character is formed, strength of mind is increased, and intellect is sharpened, as a result of which one can stand on one’s own feet.

Having analyzed the goal or objective of education, the next question that naturally arises is about the method of imparting education. According to him, knowledge is inherent in every man’s soul. Here again, we note the Vedantic foundation of Swamiji’s theory. To drive his point home, he refers to the growth of a plant. Just as in the case of a plant, one cannot do anything more than supplying it with water, air and manure while it grows from within its own nature, so is the case with a human child. What we mean when

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