Was Othello Really a Tragic Hero?

1202 WordsJan 8, 20185 Pages
Othello: The Wife Abuser When first introduced to the play, Othello, I had been told that Othello was a tragic hero driven insane by a villain. The person who described him to me had led me to believe that Othello was a victim. However, when reading the play Othello, I did not feel he was a victim at all. On the contrary, Othello demonstrates all of the classic signs of a wife abuser:, interference in the relationship between his loved one and her family, prior use of violence, elevating his loved one to an unreasonable standard, unreasonable jealousy, and the use of physical force against his wife. Taken together, these factors highlight that Othello is not a tragic hero, but simply a wife-abuser. The first sign that Othello is prone to domestic violence is that he comes in between Desdemona's relationship with her father. Othello was aware that his entering into a romantic relationship with Desdemona would be problematic for Brabanzio. Desdemona is significantly younger than Othello and Brabanzio has previously chased away suitors, notably Roderigo. Furthermore, while the audience is primed to believe that Brabanzio's concerns about a wedding between Desdemona and Othello would be based solely upon his racist reaction to the fact that Othello is a Moor, the reality is that Othello and Brabanzio have been working together for a significant period of time. It demonstrates a significant level of deceit that Othello would establish a romantic relationship with his daughter

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