What Is Religion

1838 Words May 8th, 2012 8 Pages
What is Religion?
Is religion a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny or is it a system of symbols, myths, doctrines, ethics and rituals for the expression of ultimate relevance (Carmody, 2008). Religion is the human quest for experience of, and response to the holy or sacred and a combination of all individuals desire to attain the promise of a better life than that here on earth, human spirituality. Religion is the voluntary subjection of oneself to God (Catholic Encyclopedia, 1913).
Religious beliefs are the mental state in which faith is placed in a creed related to the supernatural, sacred, or divine. The beliefs that what one does in the former life will follow to the next life and good karma
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Karuna the virtue of Buddhism, understanding and identifying with the suffering of all human beings or daya, Hinduism compassion, these ethical standards set the precedents of compassion for our fellow man.

Humility, the respect for the Ultimate whether it be for God, Allah, Moses or the hundreds of other names our creator is known as, thankful for all of the blessings that the ultimate has bestowed upon his children. Christianity, “Blessed be the meek for they shall inherit the earth” (Matthew 5:5); Islam’s observance of the five pillars of faith (Carmody, 2008); Taoism respect of nature and Buddhists release of anger and learning to live life free from attachments, all signs of humility and respect deserving of the creator.

Part II
Religion supplies cosmologies, moral frameworks, institutions, rituals, traditions and other identity supporting answers to satisfy the human basic need of a sense of belonging, self- esteem and self actualization (Seuel, 1999). Beliefs, practices and rituals give meaning and shape ritual performances. Ritual enactments, strengthens and reaffirms the group’s belief as well as the individual’s belief. Through rituals and practices, the group collectively remembers its shared meanings which both the individual and the group renew the sense of unity and the members identity as well as the group and its goals (Carmody, 2008)). Part 3
Religious groups are shaped by individuals who customize