What Is The Biblical Allegory In The Lion, The Witch And The Wardrobe

705 Words3 Pages
The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe is a novel written by C. S. Lewis, first published in 1950. The story is mainly about four siblings go to the country of Narnia through a wardrobe door and their adventure in Narnia. C. S. Lewis, a British author, wrote The Chronicles of Narnia after influenced by Christianity, readers could easily find the relevance between L.W.W (an abbreviation of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe) and Bible. A Biblical allegory refers to the allegories use in Bible, and an allegory means using many interconnected symbols to represent the meaning of a narrative other than literal definition. This essay will be talking about the role of Turkish Delight/temptation, Edmund/Judas, and Aslan/Jesus that connect L.W.W and…show more content…
In Genesis, the serpent tempts Eve to eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, which can gain wisdom after eat the apple. Eve eats and persuades her husband Adam to eat either, this makes LORD God angry so he banishes Adam and Eve from the garden of Eden. In L.W.W, Edmund tempts by the magic food Turkish Delight from the White Witch. Under the temptation of Turkish Delight, Edmund tells everything about his siblings and later the plan to meet Aslan. “At first Edmund tries to remember that it is rude to speak with one’s mouth full, but soon he forgot about this and thought only of trying to shovel down as much Turkish Delight as he could, and the more he ate the more he wanted to eat, and he never asked himself why the Queen should be so inquisitive.” (Lewis, 43). The role of temptation in both L.W.W and Genesis is to make people disobey what others told them, and do things they shouldn’t…show more content…
In the Bible, Jesus is mocking by the Roman soldiers. They first dress Jesus as a king and then beat he ruthlessly. They even take off Jesus’ clothes. “They gambled for His clothes, throwing dice o decide who would get them.”(Bible). Compare with Jesus, Aslan also gets similar treatment: “‘Stop!’ said the Witch. ‘Let him first be shaved.’”(Lewis, 164). The evil White Witch and followers shamed Aslan by shaving his mane, stepping on his hair, which is very cruel and sad for Aslan. In addition, the other similarity is both Jesus and Aslan get return from death. Furthermore, when they rose from dead, there are two women that accompany with them. In the Bible, they are the two Mary; in L.W.W, Lucy and Susan first see Aslan’s return. “There, shining in the sunrise, larger than they had seen him before, shaking his mane (for it had apparently grown again) stood Aslan himself.”(Lewis,
Get Access