preview

What Is The Gettysburg Address To Men's Death

Decent Essays
It is often hard to speak of the noble acts of the dead. Many have found that earthly words are insufficient to praise the immortal dead, and if earthly words were sufficient, we would find mortal thoughts unable to comprehend those celestial praises. While preparing for this speech, I have learned, first hand,a this insufficiency, and have toiled for some time preparing these remarks. But regardless of mine inadequacy to speak about these men’s lives, it is proper that we praise them for their dedication and life. Some may minimalize these men’s death because they did not die in the glory of battle, but history shows that men are remembered by what they lived for than what they died by. Should these men not be remembered and honored amongst other soldiers killed in battle, after everything they have sacrificed? We, during our long day, will take a few pauses to remember the values and work of the past heroes these men have exemplified. Many may remember the question and comment of…show more content…
President Abraham Lincoln resolved the Civil War, but was his work finished? Of course not! President Lincoln’s life was cut short and many of the Nation’s wounds were left unhealed. His work to bring liberty to all his fellowmen did not follow him to the grave, but fell upon the shoulders of the living. The monument of a man, Martin Luther King realized this unfinished work and lived his life in the pursuit of finishing (different word, repetive “finish”) it. History teaches us that the work of freedom will never conclude, but this is not a reason to cease striving and progressing in this great work. Similarly, these seven men’s work has built upon the framework laid by the visionaries before them. Like so many times before, their work has not followed them to the grave, but has also fallen upon our shoulders. We must continue this great work; failing is not an option, for in failing we dishonor these men’s great sacrifice and all those before
Get Access