What Is The Irony In The Jungle

1592 Words7 Pages
The irony of the fact that he was doing such dangerous and masculine activities with a man who was secretly his lover perfectly exemplifies the complex nature of the book as a whole. Additionally, the imagery of the jungle is important. The jungle, where the men would go to be together represented the wild and carnal undeveloped human needs, and also their primal sexual desires. While they were hunting in the novel, the use of imagery made it represent much more than that. The jungle also becomes a place for Viveka to explore her sexual desires, as she follows in her fathers footsteps and has a forbidden encounter with Anick in the forest of Chayu. The jungle becomes a place of “fear” and “shame” for both Valmiki and Viveka, but also a place…show more content…
Despite the differences in gender, both father and daughter go through similar internal struggles. Society is an equally angry beast in both situations, and it ultimately leads both protagonists to the same end point—closing the door on their true loves in exchange for social acceptance. In a culture with such deep roots in homophobia, to the point that it could even cost you your life, this wasn't a decision that either made lightly, but the effects were far reaching. For Viveka even running away wasn't an option. Anick urges Viveka to run away with her, to a place like Canada that would be more accepting of them—far away from the crushing scrutiny of the Indo-Caribbean culture. Even a life far far away didn't give Viveka hope of escaping from the culture that oppressed them, she…show more content…
These themes that we have studied all semester are still relevant in societies today, and are so interconnected that they cannot be separated from one another. Valmiki’s Daughter expertly displayed how key issues such as race, sexuality, society, cultural norms, and gender together play such an intricate part in shaping who someone becomes and how they feel about it. Mootoo’s quest for love beyond real life’s traumatic realities of gender, identity, race and class distinctions finds it’s voice in Valmiki and his eldest daughter,
Get Access