What Is The Real Cost Of Opportunity?

1556 WordsJan 10, 20167 Pages
“What is the Real Cost of Opportunity?” People are quick to jump to conclusions in today’s society. The woman curled up under the highway overpass is homeless because she is struggling with a drug or alcohol addiction and wasted her money away. The young girl struggling to keep up in gym class is overweight because she is lazy and won’t get off the couch to exercise. And the African American man will not get the job because he is black. Some claim that a “lesser version of opportunity” is given to African American teenagers compared to what white children are given because of their race (Badger). But in reality, opportunities vary based upon one’s education and the environment they grow up and learn in. The homeless woman could be…show more content…
Education in the 21st century is evolving, children need to know more and learn faster, and for “Americans of all backgrounds” opportunities given by society are becoming more “dependent on knowledge and education” (Darling-Hammond). The reliance on education worries many, because with unequal access to education for many minority families based on where they live or how much money they have, opportunities seem only to be given out to those with the best education and many with the best education are white (Badger). Opportunity isn’t given based on race, but more so based on knowledge, and with a lower level of education, most African American teenagers and young adults are held to lower jobs and lower standards than white counterparts. This does not mean that opportunity doesn’t exist. With equal schooling, support from parents, and access to the training and skills they need, African American children and teens can achieve just what white children and teens can (Cannon). Education isn’t always about standardized tests and grades, yet, to many, education is about having people that want them to succeed surrounding them. I was listening to a podcast on NPR’s radio station, Race, and I found that education, and the
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