What Is The Symbolism Of Bijan And Manijah

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The speaker’s viewpoint in this poem is third person omniscient. ‘Bijan and Manijeh’ is among the independent, love poems of the Shahnameh. The whole story begins when people from Armenia come to the king of Iran -Kai Khosrow- to complain that wild boars are invading their fields. Bijan, accompanied by Gorgin, fight the boars and force them back to their lairs. After the fight Gorgin tempts Bijan to visit the beautiful gardens of Afrasiab, hoping he would cross the border from Iran to Turan and get into trouble. Bijan, however, crosses the border and in the gardens, he meets Manijeh, Afrasiab’s beautiful daughter. Manijeh, knowing her father's reaction to her meeting with an Iranian warrior, gives Bijan a sleeping potion and smuggles…show more content…
Giv, Bjian’s father, would not accept his son’s death and mourn him bitterly. Kai Khosrow, seeing Giv’s lament, seeks his Crystal Cup and sees Bijan alive in Turan lands. Instead of invading Turan to find Bijan, Rustam disguises himself as a merchant and enters Turan. When Manijeh hears that a merchant from Iran has arrived in Turan, she hopes that he was sent to find Bijan. They find Bijan and escape to Iran together. Afrasiab, furious with his daughter's betrayal, declares war on Iran. The Iranian and Turanian armies meet in battlefield and Turan is…show more content…
He uses various body movements, hand gestures and, facial expressions to convey the poem’s characters. He sits, kneels, stands and even runs during his Naqqali. But perhaps the most efficient element in this Naqqali is Torabi’s use of vocal expression and inflection. These two verbal expressions effectively help him to express the characters moods and dispositions. 3.1.3.1) Verbal Expression Verbal Expression is one of the most important features of a Naqqal since their means and equipment are limited to body language, voice inflection, and mimicry. Torabi’s voice in this Naqqali is loud and clear, his enunciation of each word distinct and vivid. From the very beginning of his Naqqali, he uses inflection and body language to perform. When he says “News spread: "A caravan out of Iran; hath visited the noble paladin"” he uses low hush voice. This shows that the arrival of an Iranian caravan within Turan’s lands was very dangerous therefore Torabi uses hushed voice to indicate the secret spread of the news then he returns to his normal tone continuing “Manijeh heard and hurried to the city”. In another part of his Naqqali, Torabi speaks as Manijeh when she first meets Rustam. He uses a low mild voice to show Manijeh’s womanhood and nobleness then he adds sorrow to display her distress and worry about Bijan’s fate,

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