What It Means to Be an Nco

1184 Words Oct 18th, 2013 5 Pages
An NCO in my eyes is first most a leader, someone that has his soldiers back, there to protect and defend them, mentor them, and guide them into being NCO's themselves one day. As an NCO you need to be able to share your knowledge with younger soldiers, teach them the ways of the Army, let them not only learn from their mistakes, but from the ones we have made along the way as well. An NCO needs to be able to trust in his soldiers, but more importantly, soldiers need to be able to trust their NCO's. How can a soldier follow us into battle if they cannot trust us with the smaller things? How can a soldier turn to you in confidence with an issue that they have if they can’t even trust you, as an NCO, to have their back about something small …show more content…
Because although we thought no one was watching, our soldiers were watching us. Now they have a different opinion of us as an NCO, as a leader, as their mentor. It may not be a big deal, but in the back of their minds they have that small amount of doubt in us and our decision making. Maybe one day it comes back around and they tell you "hey remember that time when you ..." or maybe they don’t come out and tell you, but they just hold it against you and talk bad about you behind your back. As an NCO, we need to be the best. Our integrity should not falter. NCO's are the backbone of the Army, and our Integrity should be our backbone.
Integrity is defined as "the quality of being honest and having strong moral principles; moral uprightness". Most people define integrity as doing what is right, legally and morally. To be willing to do what is right even no one is looking. Integrity is our "moral compass". The Army mentions Integrity as one of its core values because it requires that you do and say nothing that deceives others. As your integrity grows, so does the trust others place in you. The more choices you make based on integrity, the more this highly prized value will affect your relationships with family and friends, your soldiers and, finally, the fundamental acceptance of yourself. I am not proud of what I did for which I

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