What Native Peoples Deserve Essay

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What Native Peoples Deserve

The article What Native Peoples Deserve by Roger Sandall talks about the Roosevelt Indian Reservation in the Amazon rain forest. The Roosevelt Indian Reservation is situated on the world’s current largest deposit of diamonds and no one in the government, the local Indians and the diamond diggers want the diamonds left in the ground. However, the laws in Brazil make it impossible for anyone to begin digging there. Because of the strict laws governing the extraction of the diamonds, it has lead to the region becoming saturated in blood, murder and mayhem.
According to the 2005 article, Mr. Sandall said that the massacre of Cinta Larga Indians by rubber tappers in 1963 was the caused by diamonds, not rubber.
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Only then did the world turn its attention to the Amazon rain forest. Since the 2004 slaughter of the twenty-nine miners and murder of the man who tried to quell the conflict, several laws have gone into effect to get the Cinta Larga Indians back their land and make it illegal for mining to be done on the Cinta Larga Indian reservation. According to the article, the Figueiredo Report was established after the massacre in 1963 to deal with the “shockingly grave deficiencies and abuses that were then being tolerated by the Indian Protection Service, including the use of individual Indians as slaves” (Angeloni 230). Now that the Certificate of the Kimberley Process was passed in 2006, it has made it illegal for anyone to ship “rough” diamonds out of the country that’d been dug out from areas that are protected.
It is both interesting and horrifying to be learning about a culture being depleted and wiped-out just because they are situated on top of a large diamond deposit that greedy people want to exploit. The diamond mining is the leading cause of all the bloodshed, murder and mayhem in the region. Since the Certificate of the Kimberley Process was passed, it has made it illegal to ship diamonds out of the country that have been extracted from areas of conflict or those that aren’t approved by the National Department of Mineral
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