What does ‘oral history’ entail, and what use can it be to the agendas of anthropologists, or historians or archaeologists?

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What does ‘oral history’ entail, and what use can it be to the agendas of anthropologists, or historians or archaeologists?
Rowse states that ‘human society, its story and how it has come to be what it is, is due to the factors that operate in them’ (Rowse, 1963). This is especially true when looking at history from an oral historian’s perspective. Oral history has always been a topic open to much debate – whether or not it is a method worthy of one’s time; often branded as ‘radical history’. History very much depends on how one presents it to those looking to seek out the truth. There are various methods to investigate the past but ‘oral history’ is one method which this exploration will focus on. When one looks at ‘oral history’, it is
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Oral tradition differs to that of oral history as oral tradition is ‘no longer contemporary’. It is ‘passed from mouth to mouth for a period beyond the lifetime of the informants’ (Vansina, 1982). Herodotus is a renowned scholar from the 5th century but the question begged to be asked is ‘how did he gather his information?’ ‘It is widely believed he turned local memory into universal narrative.’ From this perspective one can see Herodotus employed the method of ‘oral history’ and a look at the beginnings of oral traditions in order to have ‘preserved Greek local tradition from oblivion’ (Luraghi, 2007). Is this an insight into oral history’s origin? Luraghi argues that ‘assuming Herodotus was the link in the transmission chain, the one where the tradition found at last a stable shape in written form, we cannot simply think of traditions which were... ready to be recorded’. He continues to argue that perhaps he did not collect all his information at once but perhaps ‘inquired’ then ‘thought a bit’ before he put pen to paper. Thucydides and his reports on the Peloponnesian Wars also offer an insight into the origins of oral history. He employed the same methods as that of Herodotus, by collecting witnesses’ testimonies and memories of the occurrences and compiling them into written form.
Oral history of today is collected in much the same way as that of Herodotus and Thucydides
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