What impact did the Vikings have on North Britain

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What impact did the Vikings have on North Britain?
Shortly before the ninth century, North-west Europe was exposed to raids and attacks from the Scandinavians. They had discovered the wealth that could be obtained from the richer communities of Britain and Frankia, both in currency and natural resources (the latter being found especially in Ireland). As time went on, during the course of the ninth century, the leaders of the attacks on these countries grew more ambitious and soon there were different motives for raiding these places. Many leaders had become content to stay and settle permanently in these abundantly richer countries. This process of Viking settlement led to the integration of two cultures, between the peoples of the
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Soon after, Orkney, Shetland and the majority of the western Isles had fallen to the new Scandinavian settlers. In 839, the Vikings had enjoyed a major victory in which the King of Fortriu, Eogan mac Oengusa and the King of Dal Riata, Aed mac Boanta were both killed in battle. In 867 the Vikings had seized control of Northubria forming the Kingdom of York . Which is also mentioned in the Annals of Ulster; “The dark foreigners won a battle over the northern Saxons at York.” Approximately three years after, Dunbarton was also taken over as well, leaving a newly combined Pictish and Gaelic kingdom which had been brought together by Cinead mac Alpin ( or more commonly known as Kenneth Alpin), leaving the Kingdom almost entirely encircled by the new Scandinavian settlers
The usual perception of Vikings plays reference to their role mainly as raiders, being disruptive and destructive. However conquerors and colonists made a more positive contribution by encouraging commerce, the growth of towns and re-shaping political structures. We can see this by the fact that much of North England had been
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