What is Community Corrections? Essay example

1105 Words 5 Pages
Introduction Essentially, community corrections ascribe to the sanctions that are usually imposed on both adults and juveniles convicted by the court of law to reduce frequencies of recidivism. Unlike other forms of sentencing, community corrections can be implemented in a community setting or any other residential setting, apart from the jails (Gendreau & Goggin, 1996). Within the past few decades, researchers have been struggling to advance community corrections through the use of effective intervention principles. In fact, these community corrections triggered the “what works” movement, a movement formalized in 1990. There are four general principles of effective intervention which the movement is currently based on: the risk …show more content…
Introduction Essentially, community corrections ascribe to the sanctions that are usually imposed on both adults and juveniles convicted by the court of law to reduce frequencies of recidivism. Unlike other forms of sentencing, community corrections can be implemented in a community setting or any other residential setting, apart from the jails (Gendreau & Goggin, 1996). Within the past few decades, researchers have been struggling to advance community corrections through the use of effective intervention principles. In fact, these community corrections triggered the “what works” movement, a movement formalized in 1990. There are four general principles of effective intervention which the movement is currently based on: the risk principle, criminogenic need principle, treatment principle and fidelity principle (Anstiss, 2013).
These principles have common features that help reduce recidivism based on meta-findings and meta-analyses obtained from hundreds of studies. It’s imperative to point out the fact that the “what works” movement has registered massive success on the basis of assessment and rehabilitation of criminals in nearly every criminal justice system around the world, especially in the United States (Cullen & Gendreau, 2011). This paper is an analysis of the aforementioned principles of effective intervention, particularly their implications and the effectiveness of each principle.
i) The Risk Principle
According to Lovins et.al (2007), the risk principle is
Open Document