What's Driving Your Team Case Study

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Chapter 6: What’s Driving Your Team? Motivation flows out of motive “Dad, you’ll never believe it. Squared Eye lives in Greenville.” This was the statement Andrew, our oldest son hit me with as I walked through the door. After a five-day speaking tour in the Northeast I was tired and desperately wanted a day off. Truthfully I didn’t know what a squared eye was nor did I care at the time. He explained, “Squared Eye is his Twitter name. He is a guy that I’ve been following on Twitter that I desperately want to meet. I just found out he lives in Greenville.” I stored it away in my memory and didn’t think much of it. I was tired, hungry and ready for a break. About a month later, I was enjoying a cup of Starbucks with a pastor friend…show more content…
There is nothing I wouldn’t do for him. He’s a person that embodies the G.P.S. framework. What is the G.P.S. framework? G.P.S. is a personal guidance system. It is likened to the GPS navigation system in a car. It stands for Goals, Passions and Struggles. I’ll give more details on this later. Think about the navigation system in your car. Most likely, if you own a newer model automobile, your vehicle possesses a navigational system. You program it with your destination and it builds a roadmap allowing you to arrive at your destination. Your GPS tells you where to turn, which route to follow and what to avoid. Each team member also possesses an internal G.P.S that’s guiding their life. They might not be able to articulate it, but I guarantee you, they have a G.P.S. As a leader, you play the role of a detective. A person’s navigation system is there and you have to search it out. If you can find someone’s G.P.S. you have the secrets to motivating them. To play the role of a detective takes the skill of stepping outside of yourself. This is a major reason leaders don’t see success. They can’t see beyond their own needs, desires and goals to objectively look at their team. It’s a subtle trap I don’t want you to fall into. Don’t become so focused on your desires that you lose sight of the fact that your team members also have goals. The ability to step outside of yourself is the trademark of a great coach. In my workshops, I teach the
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