Why Did Hitler Rise to Power in 1933?

1591 Words Oct 10th, 2012 7 Pages
Why did Hitler rise to power in 1933?
When The First World War finally ended on November 11 1918; Germany was “crowned” the losers. It was a devious time and everyone was depressed which enabled some extremist’s parties to gain support from the citizens of Germany. One of parties was the Nazis with their leader Hitler. Hitler's rise to power cannot be attributed to one event, but a mixture of factors including events happening outside Germany, the strengths of the Nazi party, and the weaknesses of other parties within Germany. Hitler used these factors to his advantage and in 1933 he legitimately gained power to become chancellor.
When the Germans heard about the Treaty of Versailles, they felt ‘pain and anger’. They felt it was unfair.
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Hitler hoped to copy his example. He launched the Munich Beer Hall Putsch (revolt). The Putsch grew out of Hitler's attempt to exploit the crisis of 1923. On the night of 8 Nov 1923 he took over the Beer Hall and forced the leaders to promise to support him. A triumphal march into Munich was planned on 9 Nov, but the police easily dispersed the Nazis. Although the Putsch failed, it - and the trial that followed - turned Hitler into a national hero, and laid the foundation of his future success. He was sent to ‘prison’ for 9 months and while he was there he wrote the best seller ‘Mein Kampf’ (My Struggle). While this was happening the Weimar Republic tried to fix the economy. The mark was replaced with the Rentenmark which was backed with American gold. In 1924, the Dawes Plan was announced. This plan, created by Charles Dawes, an American, set realistic targets for German reparation payments. For example, in 1924, the figure was set at £50 million as opposed to the £2 billion of 1922. The American government also loaned Germany $200 million. This one action stabilised Weimar Germany and over the next five years, 25 million gold marks was invested in Germany. The economy quickly got back to strength, new factories were built, employment returned and things appeared to be returning to normal. Stresemann gave Germany
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