Why Did The Cold War Start And How Did It Develop Over Its First Three Decades?

841 WordsJul 14, 20154 Pages
Why did the Cold War start and how did it develop over its first three decades? During WWII the United States and the Soviet Union fought together as allies against the Axis powers. However, it was not without tension on both sides. After WWII ended the tension between both sides continued and gradually increased. For two years they tried to come to some sort of agreement over their differences over the division of Europe, postwar economic aid, and the atomic bomb through negotiation and discussion. (Divine 2013, p. 666). Their main disagreement was who was in control of postwar Europe. The two sides could never come to an agreement that would be acceptable to both sides and so they decided to just occupy different regions in the way they each wanted to. The United States did not like Soviet communism and the soviets resented the United States refusal to treat the USSR as a legitimate part of the international community. “In such a hostile atmosphere, no single party was entirely to blame for the Cold War; in fact, some historians believe it was inevitable” (Cold War History). Containment, first proposed by George Kennan in 1947, became the basic strategy of the United States throughout the Cold War. Kenna believed that if the United States stood firm on their resistance to Soviet expansion that it would eventually compel Moscow to adopt more peaceful policies. In 1946, in his famous “Long Telegram,” the diplomat George Kennan (1904-2005) explained this policy:
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