Why Marijuana Should Be Banned

2087 Words Jun 30th, 2016 9 Pages
As early as 1853 when recreational cannabis was listed as a “fashionable narcotic” marijuana began its downward spiral from a plant that provides paper, clothing, medicinal and recreational benefits etc. to the heavily criminalized “gateway drug” it is labeled as today. The Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906 while no real criminalization of cannabis is directly linked to this law required that drugs including cannabis be accurately labeled with its contents. The later revisions of this act aimed to restrict all narcotics to include cannabis, limiting the sale to pharmacies and require a prescription to purchase/issue. From 1907 thru the late 1920’s many states enacted marijuana laws. Western and Southwestern states with an influx of Mexican …show more content…
The DuPont Company was further expanding into the fields of plastics and synthetic fibers (nylon) around this time. During this period hemp was an enormous industry in the U.S; hemp products include such items as paper and fabric, plastics and hemp seed oil was being used in manufacturing of paint all these products were able to be produced rather quickly and sold at a significantly lower cost.
Anslinger was the drafter of the 1937 Marijuana Tax Act, with that being said, Anslinger; assuming under the instructions of Mellon, set up a huge negative campaign against marijuana. At the time cannabis were mostly used by Blacks and Mexicans (The Mexican Menace), and Anslinger used people’s racism to his advantage. By doing this it made it him that much easier to justify the ban on all cannabis. One of his biggest supporters/activists was William R. Hearst a social elite who basically owned the media at this time. It also happens that Hearst also owned the paper mills and many forests as well. So not only did he jump on board for his racist prejudices he also would benefit from the elimination of marijuana which posed a threat to his timber industry. The negative campaign concealed, any and all medicinal and practical uses of the plant; which many Americans already knew, instead focusing on the negative effects and using the racial hate.
Later acts such as the Boggs Acts of 1952 and the
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