Why Prostitution Should Remain Illegal in the United States

1494 Words Oct 27th, 2012 6 Pages
Aah’Donai Wright
Mr. Manser
English 9E: Research Paper
20 April 2012
Why Prostitution Should Remain Illegal in the United States
Prostitution is said to be “the world’s oldest profession” (Ramchandran par. 1). The Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary defines prostitution as “the act or practice of engaging in promiscuous sexual relations especially for money” (“Prostitution” par. 1). Many people argue that prostitution should be legalized, but it hurts people more than it helps. Legalization of prostitution condones sexual behavior for profit. Not to mention, the increased risk of illness or infection via sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs), or death. It also does not “enhance women’s choices” (Raymond par. 45). This means that whether
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9). More so than consent, “a prostitute usually complies with the only options available to her” (Raymond par. 46). Such compliance is required by the nature of the transaction (Raymond par. 46). “Often the revenue from the job is needed to support a drug addiction or to provide supplemental means of basic subsistence, such as housing, food or transportation” (Rich par. 9). Such ill-fated choices may result in various forms of enslavement.
Another major consequence of legalizing prostitution becomes apparent when the legitimization of sex markets strengthen the criminal-enterprise of organized pimping (Poulin par. 19). Such bolstering, accompanied by a significant increase in sexual solicitation activities and human trafficking, brings with it the deterioration of these enslaved women (Poulin par. 19). Decriminalizing prostitution presents one of the root causes of sex-trafficking, to the extent that human trafficking promotes the delivery of people into slavery—a crime equally as old as civilization (Raymond par. 9). “Around the world, for those in desperate poverty, the false promise of a better life often draws victims into the control of criminals who then traffic and enslave them” (Bales par. 1). “Many victims of trafficking of persons begin their journey by consenting to be smuggled from one country to another. Because of this, the crimes ‘smuggling’ and ‘trafficking’ are often confused. Smuggling and trafficking both involve moving