William Blake Had A Strict Standard On How His Poems Should

1431 WordsJan 23, 20176 Pages
William Blake had a strict standard on how his poems should appear. In his poems, he was not very concerned with grammar or spelling, even though he was writing in a time much after the official English language had been created. Much of his spellings are very old-fashioned to us and at times can sound very awkward. Even his readers in his time found that the wording and spelling of phrases and words was quaint. William Blake also used forms of punctuation that were not considered to be standard. He used the ampersand &, instead of the word "and.” Following his unorthodox style, William Blake did not print his poems in type, instead he engraved them on an illustrated background. Engraving is now usually referred to as handwritten,…show more content…
Theological tyranny is the subject of The Book of Urizen (1794). In the prose work The Marriage of Heaven and Hell (1790-93), he satirized oppressive authority in church and state, as well as the works of Emanuel Swedenborg, a Swedish philosopher whose ideas once attracted his interest. Blake’s main concept was imagination and many people questioned if he was brilliant or just completely insane. William Blake was influenced by many great thinkers of his day, and was well aware of the conflicts that were arising between science and the arts in his era. In his work, he makes sure to define reason and explain how it differs from passions. He even assigned personalities to represent the conflicts and characteristics of these definitions in his poetry and art. There have been many men who loved to speculate the future. William Blake was one of these men, and if he spoke incoherently and obscurely, it was because what he spoke had never been discovered before. He announced the religion of art, which no man had ever done before him, and he understood it better than anyone else. He published his most popular collection, Songs of Innocence, in 1789 and followed

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