William Shakespeare 's Much Ado About Nothing

1554 Words7 Pages
‘’Beatrice and Benedick display a kind of agility which is a condition of true life, and compared with them most other characters appear wooden and immobile’’. How far would you agree with this view in terms of the presentation of Benedick and Beatrice in this dramatic comedy? Shakespearean comic world has a nature of light-heartedness and optimism, in the setting of Messina, everybody either knows, or wants to know, everybody else’s business. Gossip, hearsay and eavesdropping have taken up great proportions of characters’ lives in the world of Messina. It is a place where ‘very few can manage appropriate seriousness’. And among all, the famous Benedick-Beatrice plot in Much Ado About Nothing produces the most whimsical images and…show more content…
In this world, it is full of ridicules and jokes, though war hardly affects people’s life in the enclosed Messina. The casualties are ‘none of name’.)// The story of Benedick and Beatrice is ‘a margin, a hem or a border on the main garment’ of the love reconciliation of the Hero-Claudio plot, though arguably, the plot would easily collapse on its own since Claudio is too conventional and his speech lacks of wit; Hero appears a silent figure throughout. However, Benedick and Beatrice talk more than any other characters in the play and their sharpness and freedom is therefore at the opposite extreme to Claudio and Hero. The play sees the garment through the hem, the centre of the ‘seriousness’ lies behind the comic Sicilian society through the margin, the presentation of the Benedick-Beatrice plot. Much of the comedy comes about when the two language masters get things completely wrong in the deception scenes. As audience we love to see these ‘brilliant, virtuoso performers are fooled by more ordinary ones’. Benedick and Beatrice are no doubt superb improvisers, fast talkers who despise marriage, presumably the mature ones who can see through all illusions, get behind the appearances of matters. And it makes us laugh when the extraordinary Benedick and Beatrice are tricked, more ironically, into marriage. Beatrice proclaims she ‘have a good eye’, such pride is
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