William Shakespeare 's Romantic Comedy Much Ado About Nothing

939 Words Jan 27th, 2015 4 Pages
In William Shakespeare’s romantic comedy Much Ado About Nothing the evolution of love plays an important role throughout the course of the play. One interesting occurrence of love is the relationship between Benedict and Beatrice. At first, it appears these two witty characters utterly despise each other. As the plots unfold, their true feelings come out as well as the acceptance of the fact that they them selves are in love, but more importantly they do not allow their pride to guide them. As a result their views on love develop more positively as well as making them better people in their society. At first glace, it would appear that the relationship between Benedick and Beatrice was one that would only lead to disaster. “I pray you, how many hath he killed and eaten in these wars? But how many hath he killed? For indeed, I promised to eat all of his killing” (Much Ado I.i.4-5). These teasing words of Beatrice are of the first to come from her mouth within this play. Throughout the first half of the play Beatrice or Benedick say not one positive remark in regard to love, relationships or marriage. They both continuously mock these ideas of love as though it amuses them. The witty banter of Beatrice and Benedick shows that they are both very intelligent, yet reluctant to expose their true emotions. Even though they both bombard each other with insults and wit, Beatrice is still apparently the only female Benedick thinks about, as is Benedick to Beatrice. It could appear…
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