Witchcraft as Misogyny

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The society during the 14th-16th century viewed women as unimportant compared to men, which led to the belief that women were witches.

Act of oblivion “Women and Explanations for European Witchcraft Beliefs in the 16th and 17th Century.” (2003) The journal “Women and Explanations for European Witchcraft Beliefs in the 16th and 17th Century,” debates whether witchcraft was a tradition or part of everyday culture. James Sharpe believed that witchcraft was a part of everyday culture during that period. People targeted others for revenge or said they were a witch because they were an outcast. Anne Laurence argues that Christian and secular prosecution developed common tradition of witchcraft by popularizing a belief neither of Sharpes
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Many of the sources I’ve read talk about women giving up their religion for the devil. This source talks about men being involved and I can relate that to how witchcraft isn’t always seen as misogyny.

Katz, Steven. “The European Witch-Hunts, c. 1450-1750.” www.gendercide.org. “The European Witch-Hunts, c. 1450-1750” by Steven Katz describes witch-hunts and how females played a huge role as victims. This journal proves that not only were most women accused of being women but they were also the victims. The author of this journal brings up data and information to back up his theory that women were the victims because people were afraid of women having to much power. This journal is a good article for anyone researching witch hunts and the impact it had on females and why.

“Medieval Sourcebook: Witchcraft Documents (15th Century)” N.P., N.D. Web. 29 January 2013. The “Extracts from the Hammer of Witches” discusses the methods people used to torture witches. First, the jailors prepared torture. Second, they stripped the witches of their clothing because they believed that witchcraft was sewed into their clothing. After that they tortured them if they didn’t confess. When they were done torturing they pulled the witch aside to see if they would confess yet. They would make them believe that if they confessed they would not be put to death. This source is important because I’ve read a few things about “The Hammer of
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