Woman at Point Zero Summary

5789 WordsOct 8, 201224 Pages
Woman at Point Zero Summary Table of Contents BookRags Encyclopedia Entry....................................................................................1 Woman at Point Zero............................................................................................1 Copyright Information..........................................................................................1 Woman at Point Zero Summary ..................................................................................2 Woman at Point Zero............................................................................................2 by Nawal El Saadawi ......................................................................................2 . Events in History at the…show more content…
The rebels shipped the king off to Europe; the elite who remained in Egypt would suffer— if not at first, then later under the new regime’s populist policies. Meanwhile, the peasants and urban poor appreciated the coup, although because of the inadequacy of reforms and policies like the decision to expand industry, their circumstances would be relieved only at the expense of growing debt and dependency for Egypt. Woman at Point Zero Summary 3 Woman at Point Zero Summary In 1953 the military officers banned all political parties and abolished the monarchy. The officers were eliminating potential rivals. Their one−time ally, President Naguib, was stripped of his powers, and Nasser became the voice of Egypt, with ‘Abd al−Hakim ‘Amir in control of the army. Another former ally, the Muslim Brotherhood, a 25−year−old grassroots Islamist party, was repressed by the new regime after a Muslim Brother tried to assassinate Nasser in 1954. Nasser’s government also put down a worker’s strike, and moved against the Communist Party and other leftists. In 1956 Nasser nationalized the Suez Canal in response to the withdrawal of an expected loan from the World Bank that year. The Egyptian masses applauded this seizure of Egypt’s largest source of revenue, which had been controlled by foreign powers since its construction under the local ruler, the khedive Isma‘il, in the nineteenth century.
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