Women's Rights Movement Analysis

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With astonishing inventions such as the cotton gin, the telephone, and the airplane, the industrial revolution provided major improvements throughout Europe in the 1800s and early 1900s. As factories spread like wildfire and working hours grew like weeds, new concerning conditions arose. Child laborers, lack of minimum wage, and indescribable working conditions motivated the proletariat to speak out for their rights. Events such as the Franchise Act and Chartist Movement eventually created workers’ rights in Europe. In accordance with the mass production of steam engines, railroads, and necessary laws, the Women’s Rights Movement emerged from Britain in the 1970’s. Women such as Emmeline Pankhurst pushed for equality with violent protests that…show more content…
For the first time, female nurses were used on the battlefield to aid wounded soldiers and provide medical care. Florence Nightingale was the first British female nurse who administered medical care on the battlefields of the Crimean War. Liberal reform movements in Britain tended to be more modern, especially the suffragette movement. Suffragettes protested for equality in all aspects of life including equality and equal opportunity in the military. Furthermore, many young soldiers often witnessed traumas that they never would have imagined therefore influencing their psychological development. In the trenches, these soldiers feared for their lives and their friends lives all in defense of nationalism of their country. Many of these soldiers experienced Post-traumatic stress syndrome however, it was a new challenge for doctors and the medical field. Poets such as Siegfried Sassoon, captured the mental anxieties of warfare, through collections of poems written in the trenches. Awareness of the mental health of soldiers was considered a change in European warfare, because WWI was global and covered by the media. It was witnessed by the world through newspapers and journalists. It was a fast change due to the pace of Industrial warfare that had developed due to mass production of weapons throughout the 19th and 20th…show more content…
As the Crimean War broke out in the 1850’s amongst Russia, the Ottoman Empire, Britain, and France, Russia’s desire for more territory was crushed by the industrialized western nations. With Britain's access to coal and the west’s constant competition, inventions such as the minie ball, machine guns, and hand grenades shocked the Russians into mass industrialization and Russian nationalism. Even though countries like Britain and France had been industrializing and creating new technology for decades now, their inventions proved to be a new frontier for the Russians. Furthermore, the Crimean War dealt with ancient warfare, such as horses, and modern warfare, such as newly industrialized guns. Likewise, innovative warfare presented itself again in The Great War from 1914 to 1919. German U-boats, trench warfare, and poison gas were some of the many advancements that led to unrestricted warfare and universal issues. Contrary to heavy armored horseback riders seen just years ago in the Crimean War, World War I showed historically ground-breaking technology with mass-produced guns and powerful tanks. Although industrialization occurred rather gradual throughout western Europe, Russia quickly established themselves as an industrialized nation just years before The War. With the help of two industrial revolutions and military
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