birthday party

1002 Words Mar 2nd, 2014 5 Pages
“Birthday Party” by Katherine Brush uses literary devices such as tone, point of view, diction, and sensory details to achieve her purpose. The title of this short story is very deceiving the tone is different from the tone of the story. The tone changes from happy to sad as soon as the cake is brought out. The women tried to show affection and love towards her husband by the cake but it was basically turned down. The point of view is through a random person who doesn’t know the couple at all. The speaker doesn’t know how they are as a couple but can see that the woman is upset at her husband’s reaction to the cake. “You looked at him and you saw this and you thought, “Oh, now, don’t be like that!” this quote almost lets us know that the …show more content…
People in the restaurant give a polite and almost desperate applause, but the husband is "hotly embarrassed" (line twelve about his wife 's "little surprise”. In the final paragraph, Brush clearly reveals her sentiments about the husband 's response, coloring him as cruel and "unkind" (line eighteen). The line "You looked at him and you saw this and you thought, 'Oh, now don 't be like that!" and the author 's italicization of the word "be" implies a certain amount of disgust for a husband who is trying to crush his wife 's jovial spirit. With a spit of contempt, Brush adds that "he was like that" (line fifteen), intensifying her anger and disapprobation of his meanness. Brush supplies a list of words to describe what the husband muttered to his wife as "some punishing thing, quick and curt and unkind" (line eighteen). The lengthened syntax in this sentence has the feel of the husband 's criticism of his wife for essentially being sweet to him. He comes off as a nasty man too concerned with his macho, stoical reputation to take a moment to be nice to his wife and thank her for remembering his birthday. "Birthday Party" is an ironic story with an ironic title. What this husband and wife experience is certainly no party, but merely another miserable episode in their unenviable
Open Document