breaking & entering

9355 WordsJun 4, 201438 Pages
Story Preparation Introduction Like the narrator of “Breaking and Entering,” Sherman J. Alexie, Jr. grew up on the Spokane Indian reservation in Wellpinit, Washington. He was born with hydrocephalus (water on the brain) and was not expected to survive. Throughout his childhood, he suffered seizures, yet he learned to read by age three and was gobbling up novels such as The Grapes of Wrath by the time he was in kindergarten. At his off-reservation high school, he was the only Indian, except for the school mascot. He excelled in his classes and became a star basketball player, an experience that inspired his first young-adult novel, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian. Alexie attended Gonzaga University and Washington…show more content…
Is shatter too strong a verb? I heard my window break. But break seems too weak a verb.” (p. 7, line 21) 8. “As I visualize the moment—as I edit in my mind—I add the sound track, or rather I completely silence the sound track.” (p. 7, line 23) 9. “And then one hears—feels—the epic thump of two feet landing on that same floor. Somebody…had just broken and entered my life.” (p. 8, line 1) 10. “In order to be terrified, one must lose all sense of time and place.” (p. 8, line 9) 11. “I had been a complex organism—but I’d turned into a two-hundred-and-two pound one-celled amoeba. And that amoeba knew only fear.” (p. 8, line 12) 12. “…as I hit practice grounders to the little second baseman of my heart, my son, my Maximilian, my Max. Yes, I am a father. And a husband. That is information you need to know.” (p. 9, line 4) 13. “…I’d never been the kind of man to defend his home, his property, his shit. In fact, I’d often laughed at the news footage of silly men armed with garden hoses as they tried to defend their homes from wildfires.” (p. 9, line 12) 14. “…since my family and I were not being directly threatened, what part of my self could I have possibly been defending?” (p. 9, line 26) 15. “I’m an editor—an artist—and I like to make connections; I am paid to make connections.” (p. 10, line 1) 16. “…when I saw him, the burglar, rifling through my DVD collection and shoving selected titles into his backpack—he was a
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