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Despite unnecessary changes to plot and some flawed character portrayals, Nicholas Hytner’s 1996 film adaptation of Arthur Miller’s 1953 play, The Crucible, is overall a viable adaptation of Miller’s original work. Many of the directorial changes made by Hytner in creating this screenplay are successful in further emphasising Miller’s central ideas. The characterisation of Abigail Williams is captured appropriately in the film displaying her overall manipulative nature by drawing extensively on the original text, thus exploring Miller’s idea of the use of hysteria and rumour in order to seek personal vengeance. Hytner’s depiction of Salem is well represented and the use of space, both outdoor and indoor, helps to visually depict Miller’s…show more content…
Abigail’s desire for a sense of connection, coupled with her ruthless determination for revenge is also clearly demonstrated in the film, therefore capturing the essence of her character as Miller intended. The use of space, both indoor and outdoor, is an important element of Hytner’s adaptation of The Crucible. Hytner has made some significant changes to the setting, staging more scenes outside involving the citizens of Salem unlike what Miller originally intended. Yet whilst not faithful to the text this decision by Hytner is effective in conveying to the audience Miler’s idea of the blur between the public and private world, as well as visually displaying the uncontrollable spread of rumour and hysteria within Salem. For instance, in Act 3 Proctor confronts Danforth in the “meeting house” rather than the “vestry room” as intended in the play. This larger space reinforces the authority of the court by dwarfing Proctor, a visual metaphor for his lack of power against the governing theocracy and court. As the scene progresses outside due to the children’s fear of the “yellow bird” Hytner employs camera techniques and music to heighten the sense of panic and chaos. As the girls run outside the citizens of Salem also gather around in equal terror, thus displaying to the audience the clear spread of hysteria. The swooping overhead camera angles help to demonstrate to the audience what the children are afraid of and the music is quick in order

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